'I was only joking!' - Interpreting Humour in Workplace Settings

taught by Dr Jules Dickinson PhD

Course description

Humour is an essential part of day to day communication, occurring in almost every imaginable setting and situation. Humour has been extensively researched in terms of spoken language interaction, but there has been minimal research on how interpreters manage humorous exchanges. Consequently there is very little training which focuses specifically on interpreting this aspect of relational talk.

For signed language interpreters, the modality and the cultural aspects of deaf/hearing humour can present particular difficulties. Through a closer examination of the different aspects of humour, including how and why we use humour, this webinar will look at just what makes humour so challenging. We will explore how interpreters can work proactively to create strategies to better manage this type of interpreted event, and will consider the tools you can add to your interpreting toolkit.


This course is available for 90 days from the date you purchased it.

Dr Jules Dickinson PhD
Dr Jules Dickinson PhD

Having worked as community interpreter for over 15 years, Jules has a wide range of interpreting experience across a variety of settings. Her interest in the workplace interpreter’s role led to a PhD at Heriot-Watt University, U.K. Her ground-breaking ethnographic research examined the ways in which the interpreter impacts upon the interaction between Deaf and hearing employees, with a focus on the use of humour and small talk in team meetings.

Jules continues to support the development of the interpreting profession as a teacher, trainer, research-practitioner and a Professional Supervisor. Jules has published extensively on issues relevant to workplace interpreting. Jules has presented aspects of her research at Gallaudet University and her PhD has recently been republished by Gallaudet University Press

training@linguistpd.co.uk

Course Curriculum

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